Integrity Stew

Two weeks ago, I offered two new posts on my blog, Integrity Stew. These were the inaugural interviews of a new video series featuring people with provocative insights about it, or the lack of it, in our culture.

Thanks to the feedback from many of you, I went to school on iMovie and revised these videos considerably. Future posts will bear the evidence of growing familiarity with that program.

For now though, and for those of you curious about the revised interviews, here they are:

Thanks for your patience and support as I develop this critical perspective on the breakdown of trust in our society.

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Stuart H. Brody is the founder of Integrity Intensive, a consulting firm concentrating on decision-making, leadership, and personal development. He has served prominently in law, politics, and academia. He has appeared before the Supreme Court, written numerous articles on dispute settlement and employee relations, advised Presidential candidates, served as counsel to state government on ethics, and lectured nationally on matters of ethics and integrity.

The Law of Small Things evolved from Stu’s many years observing “good people” trapped in a culturally dysfunctional understanding of personal and public integrity. He is committed to dispelling these illusions and paving the way for more authentic personal living and inspired public leadership.

A pilot and avid outdoorsman, Stu has climbed mountains, run marathons, and trekked around the world. He lives in the Adirondacks of New York and in the Sonoran desert south of Tucson. He teaches at universities in both states.

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Mark Fisher - November 4, 2019

As a British person living for a few years in America in the early 1980s, finding the existence of National Public Radio, and listening to All Things Considered, as well as Morning Edition, was a relief to someone used to public broadcasting. I would say the same for PBS NewsHour and PBS documentaries. I happily paid up during pledge week, and gave memberships to my friends.

The irony is that the integrity of pubic broadcasting in Britain has dived, leaving me sometimes longing that we had something here like All Things Considered and Morning Edition. Perhaps my memories of these are clouded by optimism, but I have often thought that I would willingly pay to get some grown-up programming. As it is, funding for public broadcasting here is involuntary (albeit that radio broadcasts don’t reqire a licence) and with little scope for people in influencing its content.

I think John Davies has the right idea – pay up your pledge because public broadcasting is important, but let them know why you are doing it.

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